The Portal to Texas History Supports K-12 Education

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Ten years ago Texas history teachers had few options when looking for primary source materials to support their lessons. Now there is a bountiful supply of digital photographs, documents, maps, artifacts, and more that are freely available online through The Portal to Texas History. More than 200 institutions which include universities, historical societies, private collections,… Read more »

Interesting Image

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Twice a month, staff members choose an “Interesting Image” to share from the digital collections.  This image is called [Jim Braud Cheering for Crawfish] owned by the University of Texas At San Antonio Institute of Texan Cultures.See more: negatives (photos)  | Texas Folklife Festival  |  items with the term “crawfish”

Did You Know…?

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…that you can see usage statistics for items, collections, and contributing partners/departments in the digital collections? We have statistics available to see how often items are being used at several granularities (e.g., by partner, collection, or item). At each level, there is a link or tab to view “Statistics.”

Transportation in Texas

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Historically, people have found lots of ways to travel, particularly in a state as large as Texas.  One collection in The Portal to Texas History titled, “Are We There Yet? Transportation in Central Texas” explores various methods of transportation through images. The collection comprises photographs from three different institutions, digitized under a grant project.The photographs… Read more »

Did You Know…?

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…that printed documents in The Portal to Texas History and UNT Digital Library are full-text searchable? Learn more about how full text searching works and how to find results in page text.

Traveling the National Road of Texas

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In 1844, the Congress of the Republic of Texas passed a law to open and establish a National Road. Running from the Elm Fork of the Trinity River to Kiomatia Crossing on the Red River in far northeast Texas, this Central National Road was set to become part of a larger “international highway” connecting San Antonio to St. Louis. Travel with us through The Portal to Texas History to learn more from primary and secondary resources.

Interesting Image

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Twice a month staff members choose an “Interesting Image” to share from the digital collections.  This postcard (chosen in honor of Valentine’s Day) is called Bringing Home the Game and is part of the Private Collection of Joe E. Haynes.See more: postcards | Valentine’s Day items | items with the term “hearts”

Welcome to the UNT Digital Collections Blog

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Welcome!  This blog is meant to provide informal information about The Portal to Texas History and the UNT Digital Library as well as some of the related resources.  We’re planning to share some of the things that we think are particularly neat about new collections, features, and how we make it all happen.